Hi everyone,

I was contacted by Mark Loeb from McMaster University.  He is conducting a study to find out whether there was a genetic susceptibility that led some people to develop paralysis following infection with the polio virus.  If you are a polio survivor you may be interested in taking part in this study.  This would mean completing a questionnaire and sending us a saliva sample. Participating would help us to gain important knowledge and understanding about why some people developed paralysis and others did not and how the immune system may have responded to the polio virus. The information could help the development of therapies for polio and related viruses which continue to pose a threat to vulnerable people worldwide.

If you are possibly interested in participating please contact McMaster University at 1.888. 541. 2821 or email polio@mcmaster.ca for more information. 

I've attached his letter so that you can read all the information.

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I did sign up for this and found out that also  the University of Washington has similar type of studies and are looking for volunteers as well. I signed up for one of their studies which will be for 5 years. Each year they will send a survey and after completing it each year will send you $25.

If you are interested here is how to get in touch with them:

We have attached a list of frequently asked questions (FAQ) that we hope will answer your questions about the participant pool. Please do not hesitate to contact our office at 866-932-6395 or respool@uw.edu* with questions or concerns you may have. We greatly appreciate your participation!

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